3D Sculpture

Second Year

Specialization in Computation Arts

3D Sculpture

3D Sculpture

Cart 362 — Winter 2018

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Concept art

Concept art

Hero prop: witch’s broom.

Cart 362 — Winter 2018

Beyond the Door

The final website

The final concept of this project was to create the online unveiling for a novel release from a well-known Science Fiction author. It would be posted as a single link with no context on the author’s social media pages. The users who are brought to this site would be immersed into the opening scene of the book, as the protagonist in second person. While the initial effect of the page is beautiful, as the user actually begins to read the words appearing on the page, they will begin to feel unsettled. To get to the goal, they must discover the key to keep moving forward. The interaction and motion is completely decided by the user, didacting what form the text takes on and forming new sentences out of a unique selection of words on the page. The story ends on a cliff-hanger, notifying users of the new novel’s release.

I used PT Serif in its normal weight. I was inspired by traditional novel body type, but found this type had a futuristic twist as it is a very contemporary typeface with harsher strokes and geometric aspects.

I kept the design monochromatic, somber, and mysterious to match the storyline. If the protagonist is in the dark, the page is black. Upon being flooded with light, the text becomes almost unreadable, mimicking white spots in their vision.

Cart 345 — Fall 2017

Montreal Explained App

Montreal Explained App

Link to final app (mobile only)

Cart 351 — Fall 2017

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Wolf in Sheep's Clothing App

Wolf in Sheep's Clothing App

View the website here

The structure of A Wolf In Sheep’s Clothing lends itself perfectly to Debord’s theory of the derive; the game design encourages a subversive exploration of a given location under the pretense of play. The game’s parameters are dynamic and time-based; at the beginning of every day, players in a given area (in the case of this scope, the Concordia EV Building) are assigned the role of either sheep or wolf (with the limitation of one wolf per area), and are encouraged to explore the building floor by floor (if need be) to either capture sheep or expose the wolf.

Developing tactics to capture sheep is dependent on the location’s day-to-day happenings. For example, if the wolf wants to blend in well and capture a higher amount of sheep, they’d need to learn at what points is there more movement in a certain area. In the case of the EV building, the wolf could learn when classes end/begin to catch the influx of students going from class to class or leaving. In a way, it encourages users to better understand not just their surroundings but what people do in them.

Players can post messages on the ‘Board’ to give hints about the wolf (or if the player is a wolf, coyly try to lure more sheep to a location). Friends can also be added, in case a message wants to be sent but not publicly on the board. Finally, a mini-map will be visible on the screen at all times, and can be clicked on to open the map screen. Players are represented by white dots on the map, and can be clicked on to message. A “discovery radius” will surround the current player, wherein sheep can be captured upon entry.

The technology behind the game is a mix of typical locative game tech (GPS map systems, ie. TomTom’s API) and more localized developed tech (an interactive floor by floor view of the building.) It’s a mainly UI-driven game, so a lot of the technical burden is placed on creating that interactive map since it would need to be customized to the location the game is played in.

As the player base increases, the game has the potential to expand to include multiple wolves as well as items.

Multiple wolves could either work together once they find each other, or against another to gain the most points individually.

Items could include a "decoy sheep" that can be placed by a wolf to attract other sheep, or by a sheep to attract the wolf to a certain location. Another item could be a timed "invisibility cloak" that masks an active user from the map. The wolf could use this to mask their trail, while a sheep could use it to do some investigating.  

Cart 351 — Fall 2017

Data Visualization

Data Visualization

Click here to view the website

I decided to take a silly approach in this project. Listening to the popular 2005 hit “Remember the Name” by Fort Minor, a song that later became a meme and whose lyrics have now lost all serious meaning, I sorted its opening lines into an arrangement of dark, minimalist, and moody looking graphs. I made three separate conceptually contrasting visualizations of this data that can be viewed on rotation upon clicking an icon in the top left corner. In the first two graphs, hovering over a specific instance of data highlights all of the pertaining information. In the third data visualization, a square shrinks and grows upon hovering over a line of data.
This is the first project I completed using Javascript, and was a learning experience. Each HTML page consists of its own unique CSS and JS page. The HTML holds placeholder information and the general structure of the webpage. The CSS simply handles the colours of the content, and some of the opening and selection transitions. The information and its quantities are all written in Javascript as variables. The size of the bars and positions of the lines and text are all relative to the size of the graphs, by calculating the width or height of the chart / 100, and then * the percent of the information. When the user hovers over text, the lines and bars are highlighted as well, using a for loop and arrays.

Cart 351 — Fall 2017

Twitter for Authors

Twitter for Authors

Visit the mock-up website

Twitter’s 140 character limit was the platform’s initial focus. The user’s quick and spontaneous messages forced into brevity are what made the platform so unique. Since Twitter’s rise to fame, the platform has completely strayed away from this concept to keep up with the competition, and their character limit is now barely a nuance. My case: many people simply take a screenshot of a block of text; the character limit has been nullified. Further, as many social media platforms are getting the idea that pictures and videos are more stimulating than text, Twitter has shifted its focus towards the visual rather than the written.

As I use twitter as a sort of curated, personal and purely visual art gallery, I challenged myself by reverting Twitter’s function back to writing. I combined the concepts of “exquisite corpse”, whereas many artists collaborate on a single piece while not knowing what the other has drawn, and “four word stories”, where the first person writes the first four words of a story in a notebook and passes it onto the next to continue it.

The homepage would simply show a prompt waiting to be filled. The user would type the continuing sentence, then press the return button to send it off to the next person. They would be able to sort the stories by genre, rating, etc., or start their own. The result of this mass-collaboration would be chaotic, hilarious, or even poetic short stories.

Cart 351 — Fall 2017

 Architecture using basic shapes  Cart 361 — Fall 2017

Architecture using basic shapes

Cart 361 — Fall 2017

 Low-poly diorama  Cart 361 — Fall 2017

Low-poly diorama

Cart 361 — Fall 2017

Low-poly animation

Cart 351 — Fall 2017